Congress ends government shutdown, as Senate agrees to immigration debate

Congress ends government shutdown, as Senate agrees to immigration debate 

Posted: 6:11 pm Monday, January 22nd, 2018

By Jamie Dupree

Ending a three day stalemate that resulted in a federal government shutdown, Democrats on Monday dropped their filibuster of a temporary spending bill in the Senate, allowing the Congress to swiftly approve a resumption of government funding, which will put hundreds of thousands of federal workers back on the job immediately.

“I am pleased that Democrats in Congress have come to their senses,” President Donald Trump said in a written statement issued by the White House, as Republicans said Democrats had folded under pressure.

The Senate voted 81-18 to re-open the government. The House followed soon after, voting 266-150 in favor of the plan.

The deal reached on Monday between the two parties not only allows government funding to resume, but will re-start negotiations on major budget issues, as well as the question of what should be done with illegal immigrant “Dreamers” in the United States.

“We will make a long-term deal on immigration if, and only if, it is good for our country,” the President said, as he met separately with Senators of each party on the matter.

When asked if they had been on the short end of the shutdown fight, Democrats emphasized the deal on immigration legislation, which will allow a Senate debate if there is no negotiated deal by February 8.

“What other choice did we have?” said Sen. Bill Nelson (R-FL) to reporters. “Otherwise, to go in gridlock and shutdown for weeks? I mean, that’s not acceptable.”

Lawmakers also approved language that will insure federal workers and members of the military will be paid, despite the funding lapse of the last three days.

While this agreement ended the shutdown, it didn’t solve the underlying problems which contributed to the high stakes political showdown.

Both parties must still work out a deal on how much to spend on the federal government operations this year – President Trump wants a big increase in military spending, while Democrats want extra money for domestic programs.

And then, there is immigration, which has bedeviled the Congress for years, and could again, as lawmakers try to work out a deal with something for both sides.

“There’s a symmetric deal to be done here on these DACA young people,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), who joined a small group of other GOP Senators in meeting with the President this afternoon on immigration.

Perdue says the deal is simple – Democrats get protections for illegal immigrant “Dreamers,” while Republicans would get provisions “to provide border security, end chain migration issues, and end the diversity visa lottery.”

The White House emphasized that as well.

But to get something into law, lawmakers will need some help from the President.

“What has been difficult is dealing with the White House, and not knowing where the President is,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), as Republicans have complained publicly about conflicting signals on immigration from Mr. Trump.

“Congress should act responsibly to allow these young people to stay,” Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD) said of the “Dreamers.”

But before those immigration talks can resume in earnest, Republicans were still spitting mad about what they felt was a political stunt by Democrats, in shutting down the government for three days.

“This is a travesty,” said Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH).

“This whole thing should never have happened,” said Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL).

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